King Seqenenre Taa, Queen Ahmose Nefertari to be part of Pharaoh's Royal Parade

Nevine El-Aref , Sunday 21 Mar 2021

22 mummies will be transferred during the parade from their current place at the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir to their final exhibition destination at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation in Fustat

King Seqenenre Taa
The sarcophagus of King Seqenenre Taa

As part of Ahram Online's daily series on the much-awaited Pharaohs' Royal Parade, which will be held on 3 April, today's mummies are of King Seqenenre Taa and his daughter Queen Ahmose Nefertari.

King Seqenenre Taa and Queen Ahmose Nefertari are among 22 mummies that will be transferred during the parade from their current place at the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir to their final exhibition destination at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation (NMEC) in Fustat.

King Seqenenre Taa was the last king of the 17th Dynasty. He was the ruler of Thebes (modern day Luxor). History remembers Seqenenre Taa as the king who began the war of liberation against the Hyksos, a war which was inherited by his sons Kings Kamose and Ahmose I.

Seqenenre Taa’s mummy was found inside a massive anthropoid coffin of cedar in the cachette of Deir Al-Bahari, west of Luxor in 1881.

Studies revealed that the king died in his 40s. His skull bears marks of horrific wounds, almost certainly the result of a battle against the Hyksos

His daughter, Queen Ahmose-Nefertari, was married to her brother, Ahmose I, the founder of the 18th Dynasty and the New Kingdom. The royal couple bore several children, including Amenhotep I, who succeeded his father as king.

Queen Ahmose-Nefertari
Queen Ahmose-Nefertari
The sarcophagus of Queen Ahmose-Nefertari

She was powerful and influential during her lifetime, she maintained her power during the reign of her son, Amenhotep I. Both mother and son were venerated as a divinised couple by the Egyptians, especially in the Necropolis of Deir Al-Medina.

The mummy of the queen was found in a massive anthropoid coffin of wood and cartonnage in the Deir Al-Bahari cachette in 1881.

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