Kings Thutmose I and II to be part of Pharaoh's Royal Parade

Nevine El-Aref , Tuesday 23 Mar 2021

King Thutmose II is the son of King Thutmose I, whose reign was secured through his marriage to his half-sister, Hatshepsut, daughter of Thutmose I’s principal Queen Ahmose

Thutmose

As part of Ahram Online's daily series on the much-awaited Pharaohs' Royal Parade, which will be held on 3 April, today's mummies are Kings Thutmose I and II who will join the other royalties on their journey across Cairo from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation.

Both kings are from the 18th dynasty of the New Kingdom. King Thutmose I became king after King Amenhotep I's death without an heir.

He came to the throne around the age of 40 and is thought to have ruled for more than 10 years. His principal wife was Ahmose, they were the parents of Queen Hatshepsut.

He was a warrior, and his accomplishments included substantial campaigns as well as the expansion of the Egyptian rule in the south.

His military campaigns, which were recorded in the tombs of several of his officials, opened new opportunities for trade, diplomacy and economic exploitation with Egypt’s neighbors.

King Thutmose II is the son of King Thutmose I, whose reign was secured through his marriage to his half-sister, Hatshepsut, daughter of Thutmose I’s principal queen Ahmose.

His son, Thutmose III, then succeeded him on the throne.

His mummy was discovered in the Deir El-Bahari Cache (TT 320) west of Luxor in 1881. Studies show that the king died at approximately the age of 30.

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