Multimedia

PHOTO GALLERY: Snapshots from Egypt's 23 July revolution




This is a general view of a demonstration taking place at Opera Square in Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 25, 1952 (AP)

British troops, protected by armored car at left, rush into action in Ismailia, Egypt on Jan. 25, 1952 during fierce battling with Egyptians. Action is taking place outside the Egyptian police headquarters where the British fought the police and their guerrilla followers. (AP)

A crowd marches towards Shepherd Hotel in Cairo, Egypt on Jan. 25, 1952. (AP)

15 View of the Rivoli Cinema, in Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 26, 1952, as it was burns during the rioting. A large crowd watches as firemen attempt to extinguish the blaze. (AP)

Fields guns take up a commanding position on the road to Heliopolis in the northern suburbs of Cairo on July 23, 1952 following the bloodless coup effected by the Egyptian army. (AP)

A huge banner demanding release of political prisoners is carried by Egyptians in a procession through Cairo streets on Nov. 14, 1951 as a three-day 'Hate Britain' campaign is started.(Photo: AP)

British troops search for guerrillas in the sniper-ridden southwest section of Ismalia, Egypt, Jan. 19, 1952, after an outbreak of violence in the area, during which two soldiers and a nun were killed, and nine other soldiers were injured (Photo: AP)

A waving, shouting crowd demonstrates against Great Britain in Cairo on Oct. 23, 1951 as tension continued to mount in the dispute between Egypt and Britain over control of the Suez Canal and the Sudan. Police used tear gas to disperse Cairo mobs and fired into other crowds in Alexandria. (Photo: AP)

An Egyptian army tank and field guns are drawn up in front of the royal Abdin Palace, in Cairo, on July 26, 1952. Appointed Premier Ali Maher Pasha issued an ultimatum to King Farouk I, forcing the Egyptian monarch to abdicate. (AP)

General Mohamed Neguib Bey, broadcasts to the people of Egypt, in Cairo July 24, 1952. After the bloodless coup Aly Maher Pasha took office as Premier and on July 26 issued an abdication ultimatum to King Farouk. The king abdicated in favour of his seven-month-old son, Prince Ahmed Fuad, and left the country for Italy on his royal yacht. (AP)

This crowd of enthusiastic female admirers of Gamal Abdel Nasser gathered outside his Cairo residence on Jan. 22, 1956, to cheer him after he proclaimed a new Egyptian constitution that promised new rights for women. The feminine contingent hopes the right to vote will be one of their new liberties (AP)

Egyptian Premier Gamal Abdel Nasser waves to a crowd of people as he stands in an open car moving through the streets of Cairo, Egypt on June 19, 1956. Nasser announced at a rally in Republican Square that martial law in Egypt is ended, that the revolution council which has ruled Egypt since King Farouk was deposed is dissolved, that Egypt's new constitution will be ratified and that a new president will be elected. (AP)

Egyptians crowd the tops of telegraph poles in Cairo, Egypt on Oct. 1, 1970, for a grandstand view of President Gamal Abdel Nasserís funeral procession. (AP)

Drawn on a gun carriage the flag-covered coffin of President Abdel Gamal Nasser passes through dense crowds in Cairo, Egypt on Oct. 1, 1970. (AP)

With their hands on their heads, some of the Egyptian police are escorted by British troops, from the police stations at El-Hamada and Tel-El-Kebir, to the local railway station in El-Hamada, Jan. 16, 1952. The British army were trying to capture guerrillas who had been sniping at British troops. (AP)

A British Centurion tank mounts guard as British troops search for guerrillas in the sniper-ridden southwest section of Ismalia, Egypt, Jan. 20, 1952, after an outbreak of violence in the area, during which two soldiers and a nun were killed, and nine other soldiers were injured (Photo: AP)

British bren-gun carriers occupy a commanding position during the search for guerrillas in the sniper-ridden southwest section of Ismalia, Egypt, Jan. 19, 1952, after an outbreak of violence in the area, during which two soldiers and a nun were killed, and nine other soldiers were injured (AP)

Egyptian police in action against British troops during the two-day skirmish in the outskirts of Suez, Jan. 3, 1952. Egyptians charged the British with aggression and claimed to have killed 15. The British say they were engaged in a mopping-up operation following sniping attacks in the area of the water-plant and claim to have killed 23 Egyptians. British casualties were six wounded, say British authorities there. Egyptian casualties, as given by the Egyptian authorities, were 38 wounded (AP)

Meeting of the Egyptian "Free Officers" in Cairo in 1952. The Free Officers forced King Faruq 23 July 1952 to leave the throne and replaced him by his son King Fouad. Mohammed Nagib (2R) Gamal Abdel Nasser (3R) Anwar al-Sadat (From 4L). (AFP)

Egyptian army tanks and field guns are drawn up in front of the royal Abdin Palace, in Cairo, on July 26, 1952. Appointed Premier Ali Maher Pasha issued an ultimatum to King Farouk I, forcing the Egyptian monarch to abdicate. (AP)

General Mohamed Neguib Bey, with newly appointed Premier Aly Maher, in sunglasses, at Maher's office in Alexandria, July 26, 1952. Maher has just delivered an abdication ultimatum to King Farouk. The king abdicated in favour of his seven-month-old son, Prince Ahmed Fuad, and left the country for Italy on his royal yacht. (AP)

Ex-King Farouk of Egypt made his first public statement since he went into exile, at a press conference on the terrace of Hotel Eden Paradiso at Anacapri, Italy on July 31, 1952, where he and his party are staying. Left to right: Queen Narriman; baby-King Fuad II; Farouk; Princess Fawzia; Princess Fadia; nurse (reportedly English); Princess Ferial (completely hidden behind nurse); as they prepare for posing for pictures on the terrace of Hotel Eden Paradiso. (AP)

Egyptian feminist Doria Shafik (L) meets 08 August 1952 with Egyptian Chief Army Commander General Naguib in unlocated place. Doria Shafik (1908-1975), an Egyptian feminist, poet, publisher, and political activist, participated in one of her country's most explosive periods of social and political transformation. During the '40s she burst onto the public stage in Egypt, openly challenging every social, cultural, and legal barrier that she viewed as oppressive to the full equality of women. As the founder of the Daughters of the Nile Union in 1948, she catalyzed a movement that fought for suffrage and set up programs to combat illiteracy, provide economic opportunities for lower-class urban women, and raise the consciousness of middle-class university students (AFP)

A large crowd storms into the Ministry Council Headquarters 28 March 1954 in Cairo, during a demonstration supporting the revolutionary regime (AFP)

This collection was first published in 2015