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PHOTO GALLERY: Tragedy unfolding in Haiti after deadly quake




A man burns garbage on a street in Les Cayes, Haiti, Friday, Aug. 20, 2021, six days after a 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit the area. AP

Police officers monitor the crowd as earthquake victims receive supplies during the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti, August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP

Men hand out supplies to a crowd of earthquake victims during the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti, August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP

A man walks away ith a bag of rice as earthquake victims gather for the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti, August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP

A man gives a pack of drinks to an earthquake victim during the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti on August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP

TOPSHOT - A man throws a bag of rice into a crowd of earthquake victims gathered for the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti on August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP

A survivor of Saturday's earthquake builds a shelter in the Viljoint neighborhood in Les Cayes, Haiti, Friday, Aug. 20, 2021, six days after the 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit the area. AP
Haiti

Some survivors of Saturday's earthquake spend their time talking while others sleep on a street in Les Cayes, Haiti, Friday, Aug. 20, 2021, six days after a 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit the area. AP

Mexican firefighters known as "Los Topos" prepare equipment for a rescue attempt in Les Cayes, Haiti, Friday, Aug. 20, 2021, six days after a 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit the area. AP

People watch as Mexican firefighters known as "Los Topos" work during a rescue attempt in Les Cayes, Haiti, Friday, Aug. 20, 2021, six days after a 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit the area. AP

A police officer watches as earthquake victims line up during the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti, August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP

Injured people lie in beds outside the Immaculée Conception hospital in Les Cayes, Haiti, Monday, Aug. 16, 2021, two days after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck the southwestern part of the country. AP

A boy points at an approaching helicopter bringing aid for earthquake survivors in a neighborhood near the airport in Les Cayes, Haiti, Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021. AP

Oxiliene Morency cries out in grief after the body of her 7-year-old-daughter, Esther Daniel, was recovered from the rubble of their home destroyed by the earthquake in Les Cayes, Haiti, Saturday, Aug. 14, 2021. A 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti on Saturday, with the epicenter about 125 kilometers (78 miles) west of the capital of Port-au-Prince, the U.S. Geological Survey said. AP

A woman pours water on her head as earthquake victims line up during the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti, August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP

A police officer pours water on a woman's head as earthquake victims line up during the distribution of food and water at the "4 Chemins" crossroads in Les Cayes, Haiti, August 20, 2021. - Five days after a powerful earthquake killed nearly 2,200 people in Haiti, aid was arriving but officials were eager to not repeat the mistakes that followed a 2010 quake that devastated the Caribbean nation.
With almost 53,000 homes completely destroyed and more than 77,000 others damaged in Saturday's tremor, authorities have a massive group of people that will need extensive recovery help. AFP