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PHOTO GALLERY: 80th anniversary of D-Day, the biggest amphibious assault in history!




This file photograph taken on June 6, 1944, shows soldiers unloading equipment on Omaha Beach, Normandy, north-western France after the initial D-Day invasion. In what remains the biggest amphibious assault in history, some 156,000 Allied personnel landed in France on June 6, 1944. An estimated 10,000 Allied troops were left dead, wounded or missing, while Nazi Germany lost between 4,000 and 9,000 troops, and thousands of French civilians were killed. The 80th anniversary of the D-day landings will fall on June 6, 2024. AFP

This photograph from the National Archives taken on June 6, 1944, shows US Army troops wading ashore at Omaha Beach in north-western France, during the D-Day invasion. In what remains the biggest amphibious assault in history, some 156,000 Allied personnel landed in France on June 6, 1944. An estimated 10,000 Allied troops were left dead, wounded or missing, while Nazi Germany lost between 4,000 and 9,000 troops, and thousands of French civilians were killed. The 80th anniversary of the D-day landings will fall on June 6, 2024. AFP

Picture taken on June 6, 1944 in Normandy showing the Allied forces soldiers involved in the landing operation aimed at fighting the German Wehrmacht as part of the Second World War. In what remains the biggest amphibious assault in history, some 156,000 Allied personnel landed in France on June 6, 1944. An estimated 10,000 Allied troops were left dead, wounded or missing, while Nazi Germany lost between 4,000 and 9,000 troops, and thousands of French civilians were killed. The 80th anniversary of the D-day landings will fall on June 6, 2024. AFP

Picture taken on June 6, 1944 in Normandy showing the Allied forces soldiers involved in the landing operation aimed at fighting the German Wehrmacht as part of the Second World War. In what remains the biggest amphibious assault in history, some 156,000 Allied personnel landed in France on June 6, 1944. An estimated 10,000 Allied troops were left dead, wounded or missing, while Nazi Germany lost between 4,000 and 9,000 troops, and thousands of French civilians were killed. The 80th anniversary of the D-day landings will fall on June 6, 2024. AFP

Carrying full equipment, American assault troops move onto a beachhead code-named Omaha Beach, on the northern coast of France on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy coast. The greatest armada ever assembled, nearly 7,000 ships and boats, supported by more than 11,000 planes, carried almost 133,000 troops across the Channel to establish toeholds on five heavily defended beaches stretched across 80 kilometers (50 miles) of Normandy coast. More than 9,000 Allied soldiers were killed or wounded in the first 24 hours. AP

Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Allied Commander in Chief, speaks with American paratroopers at an undisclosed location in England, June 6, 1944, prior to plans to participate in the first assault on the Coast of France during D-Day. AP

American paratroopers, heavily armed, sit inside a military plane as they soar over the English Channel en route to the Normandy French coast for the Allied D-Day invasion of the German stronghold during World War II, June 6, 1944. Nearly 160,000 Allied troops landed in Normandy on June 6, 1944. Of those, 73,000 were from the United States, 83,000 from Britain and Canada. Forces from several other countries were also involved, including French troops fighting with Gen. Charles de Gaulle. The Allies faced around 50,000 German forces. AP